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Wednesday, November 16, 2011

Hair Weaving

The hair weaving process consists of weaving the fringe hair of a balding man with thread to form up to six seams across his barren skull. Patches of hair are then sewn to these seams and the client's new hair is cut and styled.
Although the new hair is never removed by the customer himself, it is not permanent. The added hair must be tightened at least ounce a month as the patrons' own hair grows and pushes the woven thatch out of place.
Obviously, there are qualified people who are dedicated to this profession, but their reputation somewhat marred as a result of the antics of phonies. Probably no other hair replacement method has been so seriously infiltrated by fly-by-nighters as hair weaving. Looking to get rich quick and not bothering to learn the trade, unreliable characters have opened up dozens of hair weaving (or hair weft) parlors in every major city, only to close them down when officials or dissatisfied customers get too hot on their heels.
The initial investment can be as high as $800. Monthly re-tightening expenses average $50 per session. Unfortunately, this can run into thousands of dollars over a period of years.
In addition, customers are asked to come back for their shampoos to insure the safety of the wefts or weaving. Hair and scalp become very difficult to keep clean, because ordinary washing of the hair and weaves can cause melting and accumulation of dirt under the seams. If the hair is handled harshly, the wefts can be torn from the scalp, resulting in bleeding or even infection.
The patron's own hair is stretched by this process and is actually pulled out one-half to one inch beyond where it should be at the time. Certainly this doesn't do much for the health of the hair!
When the added hair oxidized (charges color because of wear and exposure to the elements), it must be cut loose and the process is repeated at an additional expense to the client.
Seems like a lot of time, a lot of discomfort, a lot of inconvenience, and a lot of money!
David Hansen
www.davidhansen.com

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